GJIA ONLINE

Welcome!

The Georgetown Journal of International Affairs (GJIA) is proud to announce its first-ever online journal.

Building on the success of GJIA’s semi-annual print publication, our new online format seeks to bring Journal readers more great articles, insights and opinions on contemporary issues in international affairs.

We hope our readers will use the digital edition to not only learn new perspectives on current events and international affairs—but to join in the conversation with Georgetown University students, international relations scholars, practitioners, friends and even past contributors.

We invite our readers to share their comments on our articles, and for those seeking even greater engagement to submit their own thought-provoking articles for possible publication.

Our online content is divided into four sections:

1)      The Front Page—Professors and graduate students are invited to give their thoughts on controversial and pressing topics currently in the news.

 

2)      The Georgetown Journal’s Guide to—Descriptions and analyses of little-known or often misunderstood issues, places, people and organizations. These guides allow writers to

share their inside knowledge and personal experiences with the topic.

 

3)      The Journal Revisited—A chance to look back at articles from the Journal’s history and assess their relevance and predictions in hindsight. We will revisit articles from some of the foremost experts in international affairs—from Kenneth Waltz to Madeline Albright.

 

4)      Five Minutes with an Expert—Short interviews with leaders and thinkers who fascinate, inspire and challenge our views on international affairs.

Within these four sections, we hope our readers will find a diversity of topics and perspectives that add something new to discussions on international affairs already taking place in classrooms, think tanks, journals, and the blogosphere.

Thanks for reading, and we look forward to hearing from you.

Jen Steffensen and Gideon Hanft

Co-Editors, the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs Online

October 18, 2011